dynasty

Gabriel Abrantes et Benjamin Crotty / Farah Atassi / Laëtitia Badaut Haussmann / Gaëlle Boucand Mohamed Bourouissa / Guillaume Bresson / Pierre-Laurent Cassière / Yuhsin U. Chang / Stéphanie Cherpin / Pauline Curnier Jardin / Mélanie Delattre-Vogt / Alain Della Negra et Kaori Kinoshita / Dewar et Gicquel / Bertrand Dezoteux / Rebecca Digne / Antoine Dorotte / Julien Dubuisson / Vincent Ganivet / Fabien Giraud et Raphaël Siboni / Camille Henrot / Louise Hervé et Chloé Maillet / Armand Jalut / Laurent Le Deunff / Benoît Maire / Vincent Mauger / Robin Meier et Ali Momeni / Théo Mercier / Nicolas Milhé / Benoît-Marie Moriceau / Jorge Pedro Núñez / Masahide Otani / Florian Pugnaire et David Raffini / Jean-Xavier Renaud / Raphaëlle Ricol / Bettina Samson / Alexandre Singh / Oscar Tuazon et eli hansen / Cyril Verde + Mathis Collins / Duncan Wylie / Chen Yang

barre

1 exhibition, 2 locations, 40 artists, 80 propositions: DYNASTY is the culmination of a never before seen collaboration between the Musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris/ARC and the Palais de Tokyo.
The artists infuse the totality of the exhibition space and each of them presents, in a fresh stereophonic approach, a work in each of the two venues.
Through its many techniques and stylistic approaches, DYNASTY reveals the drive of a generation and the diversity of its preoccupations, ranging from the most experimental technoscience to the most intimate autofiction. Fragile materials are subject to usages that revalorize them while the development of the computer modeling transforms our grasp of space and objects.
This project continues the work of prospecting carried out previously by the Palais de Tokyo and by ARC at the Musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris.



logos dynasty

barre


 AFTER





OPENING ON TUESDAY OCTOBER , 19TH
Following on from Ugo Rondinone and Jeremy Deller, the Palais de Tokyo invites Adam McEwen the New Yorkbased British artist to take on the role of curator and come up with an out-of-the-ordinary-project.
« The rooms at the Palais might stand in for the artist’s studio, which might stand in for the artist’s mind – which is a landscape, and the landscape demands some kind of gesture. ‘Progress’ in this context is temporary. It needs to be reinvented afresh, endlessly. The phrase Fresh Hell is often misattributed to Shakespeare, presumably from Macbeth, but in fact it comes from Dorothy Parker. This quiet piece of historical slippage seems appropriate. History uncoils in a tangled, organic mess across the studio floor, and the artist picks through it, looking for what to do next. »
Adam McEwen


barre